Date   

Re: AA5B, June VHF Contest

James Duffey
 

Nice writeup Bruce.

Here are some pictures I took of our operation:


The 2M+ antennas should have been higher and a bit longer.

James Duffey KK6MC
Cedar Crest NM

On Jun 18, 2020, at 09:17, Bruce Draper <bruceaa5b@...> wrote:


Duffey (KK6MC) and I operated Field Day style from a site about 8 miles south of Tijeras, in the NE corner of DM64. It took 3 or 4 trips out there to get stuff set up, and 2 more to take everything back home. For me, it was a chance to get out of the house (been cooped up for too long with 6 other people) and out of town (away from the S9+30dB local signals that can make it hard to copy weak FT8 guys). For Duffey, it was an opportunity to operate the contest even after he decided that he shouldn't rove in the current environment. The site was pretty decent, with fairly low noise and good terrain in most directions.

The 6-meter station was in a small tent, barely enough room for a small table and no room to stand up ;-)   TS590sg, Lenovo laptop, KPA500 running 500 W on CW and SSB, only 300 W on digital (the amp tripped off for higher powers, I think because of low input voltage due to a long extension cord to the generator). Primary antenna was a 4-element CushCraft at about 40 feet. The other one, at 30 feet, was a 4-element YU7EF direct-feed design that I first converted from small tubing to bare wire (by formula) to insulated wire (by measuring the velocity factor at 50 MHz) and then to insulated wire taped to half-inch PVC (again by measuring the velocity factor ... it was an interesting week); when I pointed them in the same direction and switched back and forth there was no difference.

The 144/220/432 station was set up under a tarp (no heavy rain or strong winds, luckily). TS2000 plus a transverter for 220, Dell laptop. Antennas were at 20 feet on a telescoping mast: 6 elements on 144, 9 elements on 220, 14 elements on 432.

A Honda 2000eu generator ran the whole shebang.

Conditions were great at times on 6 meters, awful at other times. People hang out on FT8 waaaay too much when the band is open and signals are good. The best (and most fun) hours were the first 1 or 2 on CW and SSB, and the last 4 hours on CW/SSB/FT4. FT4 was a ton of fun, unlike its older brother.

We had decided to follow the spirit of "covid protocol" as much as practical, and that meant we didn't do very much station swapping. There was an hour or two when Duffey operated 6-meter digital and I listened to static on 2 meters, otherwise I stuck to 6 and Duffey covered the other bands.  

I haven't merged the logs yet, but I think the numbers will be close to these:
91 QSOs on 6-meter CW
93 on 6 SSB
244 on 6 digital (including a half dozen meteor scatter Qs)
38 QSOs on 144/220/432
181 grids total (166 on 6 meters, 15 on the other bands)
Score around 83 k

  73,
    Bruce AA5B





AA5B, June VHF Contest

Bruce Draper
 

Duffey (KK6MC) and I operated Field Day style from a site about 8 miles south of Tijeras, in the NE corner of DM64. It took 3 or 4 trips out there to get stuff set up, and 2 more to take everything back home. For me, it was a chance to get out of the house (been cooped up for too long with 6 other people) and out of town (away from the S9+30dB local signals that can make it hard to copy weak FT8 guys). For Duffey, it was an opportunity to operate the contest even after he decided that he shouldn't rove in the current environment. The site was pretty decent, with fairly low noise and good terrain in most directions.

The 6-meter station was in a small tent, barely enough room for a small table and no room to stand up ;-)   TS590sg, Lenovo laptop, KPA500 running 500 W on CW and SSB, only 300 W on digital (the amp tripped off for higher powers, I think because of low input voltage due to a long extension cord to the generator). Primary antenna was a 4-element CushCraft at about 40 feet. The other one, at 30 feet, was a 4-element YU7EF direct-feed design that I first converted from small tubing to bare wire (by formula) to insulated wire (by measuring the velocity factor at 50 MHz) and then to insulated wire taped to half-inch PVC (again by measuring the velocity factor ... it was an interesting week); when I pointed them in the same direction and switched back and forth there was no difference.

The 144/220/432 station was set up under a tarp (no heavy rain or strong winds, luckily). TS2000 plus a transverter for 220, Dell laptop. Antennas were at 20 feet on a telescoping mast: 6 elements on 144, 9 elements on 220, 14 elements on 432.

A Honda 2000eu generator ran the whole shebang.

Conditions were great at times on 6 meters, awful at other times. People hang out on FT8 waaaay too much when the band is open and signals are good. The best (and most fun) hours were the first 1 or 2 on CW and SSB, and the last 4 hours on CW/SSB/FT4. FT4 was a ton of fun, unlike its older brother.

We had decided to follow the spirit of "covid protocol" as much as practical, and that meant we didn't do very much station swapping. There was an hour or two when Duffey operated 6-meter digital and I listened to static on 2 meters, otherwise I stuck to 6 and Duffey covered the other bands.  

I haven't merged the logs yet, but I think the numbers will be close to these:
91 QSOs on 6-meter CW
93 on 6 SSB
244 on 6 digital (including a half dozen meteor scatter Qs)
38 QSOs on 144/220/432
181 grids total (166 on 6 meters, 15 on the other bands)
Score around 83 k

  73,
    Bruce AA5B





June contest AA5PR/R

John Klem
 

Over the last year or so I put effort into improving the antenna configuration on my rover to reduce setup and teardown times, so this time around felt I could visit 7 grids during the contest. That worked out pretty well, although my schedule was once again overly optimistic.  Given decent cell coverage, the availability of Slack for tracking, and the uncertainty of 6 m openings, it seems that simply publishing the daily grid sequence without times would work just as well.

I really enjoyed making a few more contacts on 2 this time around, including DM85/DM58 (W9RM) and DM82/DM65 (K5TA).  A little work to improve my 2 m receive capability seems to have helped, and that coupled with low-noise locations makes 2 a lot of fun. 432 continues to be a challenge and where I roved did not help, but I was happy to make a couple of contacts on that band.

I came home with a list of half a dozen things that needed fixing by a little reconfiguration, re-engineering, application of my wallet, or a smack to the side of my head.  Near the top of the list was trouble maintaining power to the radio due to power cable losses and a low-voltage interlock on the battery booster.  A consequence of that was a recurring threat of losing transmit power halfway through a QSO (particularly on 2 m) with a total reboot required, so in some cases I had to either operate with reduce power or cut attempts short.  In the head smack category was not adequately testing my new laptop setup for automated logging, which is once again the kind of thing you really don't want to be troubleshooting in the back seat of your car in DM84.

SSB contacts seemed unusually difficult even when 6 was open and there were lots of loud signals.  It's possible I didn't have a single SSB contact without at least one repeat required. The "... Romeo / rover" part seems hard for many, so perhaps I need a new callsign.  FT8 on 6 was a slogging struggle - I pretty much gave up trying to work anyone with a minus sign in front of the S/N. With band full open, FT4 was a different story - lots of quick and relatively easy contacts, especially into FN/FM.  Almost half my contacts were made in my last 2.5 hours of operation, in DM73.

And I really want to do it all again.

Bottom line, subject to a little further inspection:

143 QSO points x 100 multipliers = 14,300

The picture, assuming it makes it through, is from the edge of the caprock in DM74xv, looking west towards Santa Rosa, antennas not yet raised.

John, AA5PR/r


Re: Interesting propagation phenomenon

James Duffey
 

There has been some work in New Zealand:


And in Europe:


It seems that MSK144would be suitable for this, perhaps in the quick (5sec turnaround) mode. - Duffey



James Duffey KK6MC
Cedar Crest NM

On Jun 16, 2020, at 19:38, Keith Morehouse <w9rm@...> wrote:


Anybody have any experience with lightning enhancement on 2M or above ?

I knew such a thing existed but I've never experienced it until Saturday.  I had the 2nd radio sitting on 144.200 while I was looking for mults on 6M.  There was a pretty good line of strong t-storms to the east, over the continental divide.  For about 20-30 minutes, every time there was a strong static crash, it was accompanied by an obvious SSB signal that lasted maybe .2 to .5 seconds.  Just like a SSB meteor ping.

I assume they were probably guys out in the plains east of Denver - maybe 200 miles away.

With the new digital meteor scatter modes available, I'll bet this could actually be useful.

-W9RM

Keith Morehouse
via MotoG


Interesting propagation phenomenon

Keith Morehouse
 

Anybody have any experience with lightning enhancement on 2M or above ?

I knew such a thing existed but I've never experienced it until Saturday.  I had the 2nd radio sitting on 144.200 while I was looking for mults on 6M.  There was a pretty good line of strong t-storms to the east, over the continental divide.  For about 20-30 minutes, every time there was a strong static crash, it was accompanied by an obvious SSB signal that lasted maybe .2 to .5 seconds.  Just like a SSB meteor ping.

I assume they were probably guys out in the plains east of Denver - maybe 200 miles away.

With the new digital meteor scatter modes available, I'll bet this could actually be useful.

-W9RM

Keith Morehouse
via MotoG


Re: June contest: WB2FKO

Mike WB2FKO
 

I thought about guying the mast, but in the spirit of a hastily-assembled, day-before-the-contest setup I decided to gamble. We got a lot of heavy rain but not much wind and it managed to stay up.

On 6/16/20 5:22 PM, Bruce Draper wrote:
Nice setup, Mike, and it was good to work you in the contest. You don't need to guy the mast with that big antenna?

Bruce AA5B
On Jun 16, 2020, at 10:03 AM, Mike WB2FKO <mph@...> wrote:

Greetings from EL89.

The permanent home station is still many months from completion, so my plan for the June contest was to participate in the K5QE multi-op in EM31. Current travel conditions made this a risky proposition, so I opted to stay home and setup a 6M5X 6m beam on a 15 ft mast in front of the house (see photo). It is supported by a drive-up mount that I saved from my rovering days. The primary objective was to assess how the new QTH would work for VHF amateur radio, ie. noise, activity, propagation, etc.

Noise seems to be non-existent compared to our old Albuquerque QTH. No birdies were detected in any direction on 6m and I was able to confidently operate without the noise blanker. Pancake-flat Florida has no mountains, allowing for low take-off angles. I added 10 new 6m DXCC in about 3 days with this modest, rover-like setup and yes -- all with FT8. The downside, of course, is the weather. I was QRT from the contest at various points for lightning and water getting into a cable connection. It rains a lot here.

The contest kept me very busy. There was a pipeline of propagation up into the FM and FN grids for almost the entire weekend. It's no secret that there is a lot of VHF activity in the New England area, but a contest reveals just how much. It felt like I was playing whack-a-mole as new stations kept popping up.

It was also nice to have lots of activity in adjacent grids. When Es propagation faded, folks from around Florida and south Georgia were busy working each other on FT8. The N4SVC contest station is just north of me in EM80. They did not bother me much, except during Sunday morning meteor scatter. I have a hunch it was a new operator because the sequences were set for 30 seconds instead of the established 15 seconds on 50.260. This QRM killed half the receive window, but I was able to sneak-in 5 MSK144 QSOs when their antenna was pointed sufficiently away from me and/or the op was on bathroom break. On-the-job-training is probably not a good idea during a contest with a powerful station.

I used FT8, FT4, SSB, and even some cw to make 323 QSOs with 129 multipliers. I eventually learned the limitations of my small station with FT8, not attempting signals weaker than -8 dB. I simply wasn't being heard. The majority of contacts were made using FT4 when 6m was wide-open, probably close to 150 QSOs. Excellent propagation, chaos, and the slow slog on 50.313 eventually pushed digital ops to 50.318 and there was plenty of activity there. It was efficient and orderly with almost everybody displaying excellent contest etiquette. I used the color highlighting in the FT4 activity window to great advantage as I quickly spotted and worked new multipliers, also answering the random callers. My last two mults came quite literally in the final 60 seconds of the contest when the band was open to the midwest.

EL89 is not a particularly rare grid, although it appeared to be in some demand as I got small pileups calling me on ssb. Several thanked me for the new multiplier. Besides me, there were at least two other EL89 stations active on 6m during the contest. The grids in central and south Florida have far more activity.

New Mexico stations worked: AA5B and WS5N. Heard but not worked (to the best of my recollection): KC7QY, K5TA, W3IH, and AA5PR/R in DM73.

73 Mike WB2FKO



<WB2FKO_EL89.jpg>


Re: June contest: WB2FKO

Bruce Draper
 

Nice setup, Mike, and it was good to work you in the contest. You don't need to guy the mast with that big antenna?

Bruce AA5B

On Jun 16, 2020, at 10:03 AM, Mike WB2FKO <mph@...> wrote:

Greetings from EL89.

The permanent home station is still many months from completion, so my plan for the June contest was to participate in the K5QE multi-op in EM31. Current travel conditions made this a risky proposition, so I opted to stay home and setup a 6M5X 6m beam on a 15 ft mast in front of the house (see photo). It is supported by a drive-up mount that I saved from my rovering days. The primary objective was to assess how the new QTH would work for VHF amateur radio, ie. noise, activity, propagation, etc.

Noise seems to be non-existent compared to our old Albuquerque QTH. No birdies were detected in any direction on 6m and I was able to confidently operate without the noise blanker. Pancake-flat Florida has no mountains, allowing for low take-off angles. I added 10 new 6m DXCC in about 3 days with this modest, rover-like setup and yes -- all with FT8. The downside, of course, is the weather. I was QRT from the contest at various points for lightning and water getting into a cable connection. It rains a lot here.

The contest kept me very busy. There was a pipeline of propagation up into the FM and FN grids for almost the entire weekend. It's no secret that there is a lot of VHF activity in the New England area, but a contest reveals just how much. It felt like I was playing whack-a-mole as new stations kept popping up.

It was also nice to have lots of activity in adjacent grids. When Es propagation faded, folks from around Florida and south Georgia were busy working each other on FT8. The N4SVC contest station is just north of me in EM80. They did not bother me much, except during Sunday morning meteor scatter. I have a hunch it was a new operator because the sequences were set for 30 seconds instead of the established 15 seconds on 50.260. This QRM killed half the receive window, but I was able to sneak-in 5 MSK144 QSOs when their antenna was pointed sufficiently away from me and/or the op was on bathroom break. On-the-job-training is probably not a good idea during a contest with a powerful station.

I used FT8, FT4, SSB, and even some cw to make 323 QSOs with 129 multipliers. I eventually learned the limitations of my small station with FT8, not attempting signals weaker than -8 dB. I simply wasn't being heard. The majority of contacts were made using FT4 when 6m was wide-open, probably close to 150 QSOs. Excellent propagation, chaos, and the slow slog on 50.313 eventually pushed digital ops to 50.318 and there was plenty of activity there. It was efficient and orderly with almost everybody displaying excellent contest etiquette. I used the color highlighting in the FT4 activity window to great advantage as I quickly spotted and worked new multipliers, also answering the random callers. My last two mults came quite literally in the final 60 seconds of the contest when the band was open to the midwest.

EL89 is not a particularly rare grid, although it appeared to be in some demand as I got small pileups calling me on ssb. Several thanked me for the new multiplier. Besides me, there were at least two other EL89 stations active on 6m during the contest. The grids in central and south Florida have far more activity.

New Mexico stations worked: AA5B and WS5N. Heard but not worked (to the best of my recollection): KC7QY, K5TA, W3IH, and AA5PR/R in DM73.

73 Mike WB2FKO



<WB2FKO_EL89.jpg>


Re: June contest: WB2FKO

Bill
 

Well done Mike!

Bill W7QQ

On Jun 16, 2020, at 10:03 AM, Mike WB2FKO <mph@...> wrote:

Greetings from EL89.

The permanent home station is still many months from completion, so my plan for the June contest was to participate in the K5QE multi-op in EM31. Current travel conditions made this a risky proposition, so I opted to stay home and setup a 6M5X 6m beam on a 15 ft mast in front of the house (see photo). It is supported by a drive-up mount that I saved from my rovering days. The primary objective was to assess how the new QTH would work for VHF amateur radio, ie. noise, activity, propagation, etc.

Noise seems to be non-existent compared to our old Albuquerque QTH. No birdies were detected in any direction on 6m and I was able to confidently operate without the noise blanker. Pancake-flat Florida has no mountains, allowing for low take-off angles. I added 10 new 6m DXCC in about 3 days with this modest, rover-like setup and yes -- all with FT8. The downside, of course, is the weather. I was QRT from the contest at various points for lightning and water getting into a cable connection. It rains a lot here.

The contest kept me very busy. There was a pipeline of propagation up into the FM and FN grids for almost the entire weekend. It's no secret that there is a lot of VHF activity in the New England area, but a contest reveals just how much. It felt like I was playing whack-a-mole as new stations kept popping up.

It was also nice to have lots of activity in adjacent grids. When Es propagation faded, folks from around Florida and south Georgia were busy working each other on FT8. The N4SVC contest station is just north of me in EM80. They did not bother me much, except during Sunday morning meteor scatter. I have a hunch it was a new operator because the sequences were set for 30 seconds instead of the established 15 seconds on 50.260. This QRM killed half the receive window, but I was able to sneak-in 5 MSK144 QSOs when their antenna was pointed sufficiently away from me and/or the op was on bathroom break. On-the-job-training is probably not a good idea during a contest with a powerful station.

I used FT8, FT4, SSB, and even some cw to make 323 QSOs with 129 multipliers. I eventually learned the limitations of my small station with FT8, not attempting signals weaker than -8 dB. I simply wasn't being heard. The majority of contacts were made using FT4 when 6m was wide-open, probably close to 150 QSOs. Excellent propagation, chaos, and the slow slog on 50.313 eventually pushed digital ops to 50.318 and there was plenty of activity there. It was efficient and orderly with almost everybody displaying excellent contest etiquette. I used the color highlighting in the FT4 activity window to great advantage as I quickly spotted and worked new multipliers, also answering the random callers. My last two mults came quite literally in the final 60 seconds of the contest when the band was open to the midwest.

EL89 is not a particularly rare grid, although it appeared to be in some demand as I got small pileups calling me on ssb. Several thanked me for the new multiplier. Besides me, there were at least two other EL89 stations active on 6m during the contest. The grids in central and south Florida have far more activity.

New Mexico stations worked: AA5B and WS5N. Heard but not worked (to the best of my recollection): KC7QY, K5TA, W3IH, and AA5PR/R in DM73.

73 Mike WB2FKO



<WB2FKO_EL89.jpg>


Re: June contest: WB2FKO

Keith Morehouse
 

..green is overrated - you need to cut it or it'll take over your stuff..and steal your TV..

-W9RM

Keith J Morehouse
Managing Partner
Calmesa Partners G.P.
Olathe, CO


On Tue, Jun 16, 2020 at 10:57 AM Jonesy W3DHJ via groups.io <mailserver=jonz.net@groups.io> wrote:
On Tue, 16 Jun 2020, Mike WB2FKO wrote:

> Greetings from EL89.
>
> ...so I opted to stay home and setup a 6M5X 6m beam
> on a 15 ft mast in front of the house
> (see photo).

HOLY MACKEREL!!
Look at that GREEN grass!!!
Do you spray it with an organic dye to look like that?   HI!HI!

73
Jonesy
--
  Marvin L Jones     | W3DHJ      | W3DHJ  | https://W3DHJ.net/
   Pueblo, Colorado  |  @         | Jonesy |     __ linux FreeBSD
    38.238N 104.547W |   jonz.net | DM78rf | 73  SK




Re: June contest: WB2FKO

Jonesy W3DHJ
 

On Tue, 16 Jun 2020, Mike WB2FKO wrote:

Greetings from EL89.

...so I opted to stay home and setup a 6M5X 6m beam
on a 15 ft mast in front of the house
(see photo).
HOLY MACKEREL!!
Look at that GREEN grass!!!
Do you spray it with an organic dye to look like that? HI!HI!

73
Jonesy
--
Marvin L Jones | W3DHJ | W3DHJ | https://W3DHJ.net/
Pueblo, Colorado | @ | Jonesy | __ linux FreeBSD
38.238N 104.547W | jonz.net | DM78rf | 73 SK


June contest: WB2FKO

Mike WB2FKO
 

Greetings from EL89.

The permanent home station is still many months from completion, so my plan for the June contest was to participate in the K5QE multi-op in EM31. Current travel conditions made this a risky proposition, so I opted to stay home and setup a 6M5X 6m beam on a 15 ft mast in front of the house (see photo). It is supported by a drive-up mount that I saved from my rovering days. The primary objective was to assess how the new QTH would work for VHF amateur radio, ie. noise, activity, propagation, etc.

Noise seems to be non-existent compared to our old Albuquerque QTH. No birdies were detected in any direction on 6m and I was able to confidently operate without the noise blanker. Pancake-flat Florida has no mountains, allowing for low take-off angles. I added 10 new 6m DXCC in about 3 days with this modest, rover-like setup and yes -- all with FT8. The downside, of course, is the weather. I was QRT from the contest at various points for lightning and water getting into a cable connection. It rains a lot here.

The contest kept me very busy. There was a pipeline of propagation up into the FM and FN grids for almost the entire weekend. It's no secret that there is a lot of VHF activity in the New England area, but a contest reveals just how much. It felt like I was playing whack-a-mole as new stations kept popping up.

It was also nice to have lots of activity in adjacent grids. When Es propagation faded, folks from around Florida and south Georgia were busy working each other on FT8. The N4SVC contest station is just north of me in EM80. They did not bother me much, except during Sunday morning meteor scatter. I have a hunch it was a new operator because the sequences were set for 30 seconds instead of the established 15 seconds on 50.260. This QRM killed half the receive window, but I was able to sneak-in 5 MSK144 QSOs when their antenna was pointed sufficiently away from me and/or the op was on bathroom break. On-the-job-training is probably not a good idea during a contest with a powerful station.

I used FT8, FT4, SSB, and even some cw to make 323 QSOs with 129 multipliers. I eventually learned the limitations of my small station with FT8, not attempting signals weaker than -8 dB. I simply wasn't being heard. The majority of contacts were made using FT4 when 6m was wide-open, probably close to 150 QSOs. Excellent propagation, chaos, and the slow slog on 50.313 eventually pushed digital ops to 50.318 and there was plenty of activity there. It was efficient and orderly with almost everybody displaying excellent contest etiquette. I used the color highlighting in the FT4 activity window to great advantage as I quickly spotted and worked new multipliers, also answering the random callers. My last two mults came quite literally in the final 60 seconds of the contest when the band was open to the midwest.

EL89 is not a particularly rare grid, although it appeared to be in some demand as I got small pileups calling me on ssb. Several thanked me for the new multiplier. Besides me, there were at least two other EL89 stations active on 6m during the contest. The grids in central and south Florida have far more activity.

New Mexico stations worked: AA5B and WS5N. Heard but not worked (to the best of my recollection): KC7QY, K5TA, W3IH, and AA5PR/R in DM73.

73 Mike WB2FKO


Re: NM VHF Society recruits?

Bill
 

We’ll take a look Brian. Our promo activity has taken a dive in 2020. Could do better.

Bill W7QQ 


On Jun 15, 2020, at 8:54 PM, Brian Mileshosky <n5zgt@...> wrote:

Greetings —

I noticed this about a recent 2 hour long 6-meter contest co-hosted by the High Desert Amateur Radio Club and Amateur Radio Caravan Club (link here)

…and this about a recent 2 hour long 2-meter contest also co-hosted by HDARC and ARCC. (link here)

Perhaps an outreach opportunity for NMVHFS to partner with HDARC and ARCC and help grow their neat idea?  Or extend invites to participants who aren’t already members of NMVHFS?

73,
Brian N5ZGT



Re: DM86 - Capulin Volcano

Bill Mader
 

I met Bernie during NPOTA in 2016.  We setup, made a bunch of HF contacts, and waited for the thunderstorm to stop (antenna disconnected) and after closing, to tear down.  Another ham with family in an RV showed up to visit.  He had trashed his HF antenna on a low overhang.  Ah, the joys of portable/mobile operations!

73, Bill Mader, K8TE
ARRL New Mexico Section Manager
ARRL - The national association for Amateur Radio
Duke City Hamfest BoD Vice-Chairman www.dukecityhamfest.org 17-19 Sep 2021
Secretary and Past President, Albuquerque DX Association 
W6H NM Coordinator, Route 66 On-the-Air 12-20 Sep 2020


On Mon, Jun 15, 2020 at 1:33 PM Bob Norton <n5epa.bob.n@...> wrote:
Thanks Jonesy,

Good pics and comments by Ranger Bernie

73 Bob N5EPA

On Mon, Jun 15, 2020 at 10:46 AM Jonesy W3DHJ via groups.io <mailserver=jonz.net@groups.io> wrote:
When I arrived at the upper parking lot at Capulin Volcano the
NPS "parking lot" attendant turned out to be a ham, too.  Not a
shack-on-the-hip guy, either.  A full fledged HF and 6M op.

Anyway, he wanted to post my "activity" on FaceBook --
which was ok with me:

        https://www.facebook.com/CapulinVolcanoNPS

The post is about half-way down the page this morning.
Even some of the comments are interesting.

I'm surprised he got a decent picture of the vehicle.  My memory is
that I was penned in by other vehicles and gobs of COVID-19 expats.

Do I get a 100 points for that -- like for Field Day?    HI!HI!


More later as I tear apart the Rover Jalopy and locate all my clay
tablets (which should be dry now in this heat....)

I'm writing a python program to automatically convert PNG images of
my clay tablets into Cabrillo formatted logs.  Real Soon Now...  :-)

73
Jonesy
--
  Marvin L Jones     | W3DHJ      | W3DHJ  | https://W3DHJ.net/
   Pueblo, Colorado  |  @         | Jonesy |     __ linux FreeBSD
    38.238N 104.547W |   jonz.net | DM78rf | 73  SK




New Mexico QSO Party -- 2020 Results posted

Brian Mileshosky
 

Greetings —

The 2020 New Mexico QSO Party, which took place last April, was a huge success.  Hams from all over New Mexico, the United States, and the world took to HF, 6 meters, and — new this year! — 2 meters for a day of fun and enjoyment.  While mobile, expedition, and multi-op categories were temporarily suspended or limited due to New Mexico DOH's COVID-19 public health order, participation was still WAY UP.  We attribute this to hams seeking a positive outlet for relief and enjoyment while much of the nation was shut down back in April, as well as super fun State QSO Party Challenge.

A huge thank you goes to the members and leadership of the Rocky Mountain Ham Radio, New Mexico who sponsored this year's event, as well as to the individuals and clubs who sponsored this year's plaque awards. And, of course, to every person and ham club who participated in the QSO Party.

Here are some statistics from this year's event:

— Logs submitted: 311
— Total NMQP QSOs logged: 8,130
— Unique New Mexico stations logged: 168
— New Mexico logs submitted: 93
— New Mexico club affiliations reported in logs: 21
— New Mexico counties activated: 27 of 33 (DEB, GUA, HAR, HID, MOR, UNI appear not have been activated)
— US states logged: 50 of 50
— Canadian provinces logged: 5 of 13
— Countries/DXCC entities logged: 17

Complete results, broken down by operating category and special awards can be found under the "Results" link at www.newmexicoqsoparty.org  Pictures contributed by those who participated this year will soon be added to the album that’s found by clicking on the “Photos” link.

Congratulations to all!  Plaques and participant certificates will be produced and delivered in the coming weeks.

The New Mexico QSO Party returns on the second Saturday of April 2021 -- we hope you and your club will join the fun.

73,
Brian N5ZGT


NM VHF Society recruits?

Brian Mileshosky
 

Greetings —

I noticed this about a recent 2 hour long 6-meter contest co-hosted by the High Desert Amateur Radio Club and Amateur Radio Caravan Club (link here)

…and this about a recent 2 hour long 2-meter contest also co-hosted by HDARC and ARCC. (link here)

Perhaps an outreach opportunity for NMVHFS to partner with HDARC and ARCC and help grow their neat idea?  Or extend invites to participants who aren’t already members of NMVHFS?

73,
Brian N5ZGT



Re: June contest - W9RM

Bill
 

Nice work guys!

Bill W7QQ


On Mon, Jun 15, 2020 at 3:04 PM John Klem <klemjf@...> wrote:
Jay - Glad I could help.  Getting there is the only hard part for me. 
You make the rest easy.  Drive, set up, turn on radio, W9RM is calling. 
And most critically, hearing me.

73,

John AA5PR

On 6/15/2020 12:14 PM, Keith Morehouse wrote:
> First off, BIG THANKS to AA5PR/r for taking the time to run a 6M
> scatter sked with me before he started running the contest from DM82. 
> That was an all-time new grid and takes me to 12 to go for FFMA.  I
> think I've worked John from almost every grid in NM now .
>
>




Re: June contest - W9RM

Keith Morehouse
 

That's my bad noise / FM broadcast QRM direction.  I'm lucky to hear anything on 6M between about 100 deg and 160 deg.  You need a respectable signal to be heard - which you certainly have !

-W9RM

Keith J Morehouse
Managing Partner
Calmesa Partners G.P.
Olathe, CO


On Mon, Jun 15, 2020 at 3:04 PM John Klem <klemjf@...> wrote:
Jay - Glad I could help.  Getting there is the only hard part for me. 
You make the rest easy.  Drive, set up, turn on radio, W9RM is calling. 
And most critically, hearing me.

73,

John AA5PR

On 6/15/2020 12:14 PM, Keith Morehouse wrote:
> First off, BIG THANKS to AA5PR/r for taking the time to run a 6M
> scatter sked with me before he started running the contest from DM82. 
> That was an all-time new grid and takes me to 12 to go for FFMA.  I
> think I've worked John from almost every grid in NM now .
>
>




Re: June contest - W9RM

John Klem
 

Jay - Glad I could help.  Getting there is the only hard part for me.  You make the rest easy.  Drive, set up, turn on radio, W9RM is calling.  And most critically, hearing me.

73,

John AA5PR

On 6/15/2020 12:14 PM, Keith Morehouse wrote:
First off, BIG THANKS to AA5PR/r for taking the time to run a 6M scatter sked with me before he started running the contest from DM82.  That was an all-time new grid and takes me to 12 to go for FFMA.  I think I've worked John from almost every grid in NM now .


Re: DM86 - Capulin Volcano

Bob Norton
 

Thanks Jonesy,

Good pics and comments by Ranger Bernie

73 Bob N5EPA

On Mon, Jun 15, 2020 at 10:46 AM Jonesy W3DHJ via groups.io <mailserver=jonz.net@groups.io> wrote:
When I arrived at the upper parking lot at Capulin Volcano the
NPS "parking lot" attendant turned out to be a ham, too.  Not a
shack-on-the-hip guy, either.  A full fledged HF and 6M op.

Anyway, he wanted to post my "activity" on FaceBook --
which was ok with me:

        https://www.facebook.com/CapulinVolcanoNPS

The post is about half-way down the page this morning.
Even some of the comments are interesting.

I'm surprised he got a decent picture of the vehicle.  My memory is
that I was penned in by other vehicles and gobs of COVID-19 expats.

Do I get a 100 points for that -- like for Field Day?    HI!HI!


More later as I tear apart the Rover Jalopy and locate all my clay
tablets (which should be dry now in this heat....)

I'm writing a python program to automatically convert PNG images of
my clay tablets into Cabrillo formatted logs.  Real Soon Now...  :-)

73
Jonesy
--
  Marvin L Jones     | W3DHJ      | W3DHJ  | https://W3DHJ.net/
   Pueblo, Colorado  |  @         | Jonesy |     __ linux FreeBSD
    38.238N 104.547W |   jonz.net | DM78rf | 73  SK




June contest - W9RM

Keith Morehouse
 

First off, BIG THANKS to AA5PR/r for taking the time to run a 6M scatter sked with me before he started running the contest from DM82.  That was an all-time new grid and takes me to 12 to go for FFMA.  I think I've worked John from almost every grid in NM now .

I had not planned a serious effort this weekend, thinking the majority of guys would simply stay on WSJT.  I was wrong and there appeared to be plenty of SSB stations to run when the band actually opened.  I have a new strategy about FT modes during the summer contests, when running 6M rate is king.  The only time I went to FT4 or FT8 was to work mults when the SSB rate dried up.  I look at it like the wolves moving into a herd of sheep, picking off the easy meat/mults and then heading back to SSB with their 'catch' and continuing to pursue rate.  When there is any opening at all, it appears that a lousy rate on SSB is easily the equivalent of a 'good' rate on FT8.  Strategies will change and I think it's going to be harder to compete in this new world of traditional/digital mix.  Although, having the 'sheep' broadcasting their grid every time they TX is pretty handy for us wolves :)

My score below.  It's about 95% 6M.  I did my usual mid-20's mults on 2 using meteor scatter and, unfortunately, the high winds all weekend (blew 40-50 MPH ALL WEEKEND, even at night) fatigue cracked the bracket holding the hardlines onto the crank up tower for 222 & 432.  The entire assembly (1 5/8" line, 7/8" line, 1/2" line and rotor/control cable) all came crashing down from 80' Saturday afternoon and pulling all the connectors out of the LMR600 rotor loops.  I don't think any serious damage was done but it was a non-fixable event.  Running big hardline on crank ups is challenging.  Sorry I wasn't available to those that need another mult above 2M.  We'll continue to redesign, re-engineer and re-break things.

583x220 > 128,700 claimed
About 17 hours of chair time.

-W9RM

Keith J Morehouse
Managing Partner
Calmesa Partners G.P.
Olathe, CO