Date   

Re: Ukrainian 222 Transverter Progress

Bill
 

Jon,

I’ll  be around this weekend. Set a date time and let me know. We’ll give it a try.

Bill W7QQ 


On Aug 31, 2018, at 8:36 PM, Jonathan Fox <w0amt@...> wrote:

I finished the 222 transverter kit this past week and did some initial setup. Per the article on the NMVHF website by W7QQ and KK6MC I checked the gate bias and found it at 2.5 volts. I adjusted it up to 3.1. I did not have an opportunity to get an on-air report of the IMD improvement.

This past Wednesday I was able to make contact with NK5W on 222.110. However, I had some frequency stability issues. At first I was low by 2 MHz, after transmitting a few times I found I was  5 Mhz high. After ending the qso I went back to the assembly instructions and found that I had missed a detail. There are two mounting holes on the transverter board in addition to the mounting hole for the MOSFET. The instructions say to only use the #1 hole as using the #2 hole can cause oscillations. I missed that the first time. I am still using the #2 hole. I insulated the PC board from the metal mounting screw with a nylon washer.

I am hoping this change will improve my frequency stability issues. If not I will remove it completely and see what that does.

The WA5VJB 4 element cheap yagi I built for an antenna worked great for the QSO I had.

Is anyone available for a 222 qso this weekend? I would like to do another on-air check of the transverter. 

73, Jon
W0AMT


Ukrainian 222 Transverter Progress

Jonathan Fox - W0AMT
 

I finished the 222 transverter kit this past week and did some initial setup. Per the article on the NMVHF website by W7QQ and KK6MC I checked the gate bias and found it at 2.5 volts. I adjusted it up to 3.1. I did not have an opportunity to get an on-air report of the IMD improvement.

This past Wednesday I was able to make contact with NK5W on 222.110. However, I had some frequency stability issues. At first I was low by 2 MHz, after transmitting a few times I found I was  5 Mhz high. After ending the qso I went back to the assembly instructions and found that I had missed a detail. There are two mounting holes on the transverter board in addition to the mounting hole for the MOSFET. The instructions say to only use the #1 hole as using the #2 hole can cause oscillations. I missed that the first time. I am still using the #2 hole. I insulated the PC board from the metal mounting screw with a nylon washer.

I am hoping this change will improve my frequency stability issues. If not I will remove it completely and see what that does.

The WA5VJB 4 element cheap yagi I built for an antenna worked great for the QSO I had.

Is anyone available for a 222 qso this weekend? I would like to do another on-air check of the transverter. 

73, Jon
W0AMT


2018 TAPR Digital Communications Conference -- Sep 14-16, Albuquerque

Brian Mileshosky
 

Greetings — 

For the first time in its 37 year history, the ARRL/TAPR Digital Communications Conference (DCC) comes to New Mexico, and will occur September 14-16 at the Sheraton Albuquerque Airport hotel.  DCC is an annual national conference, attended by hams across the United States and beyond, that highlights digital communications technologies, techniques, and capabilities currently being utilized within amateur radio or under development.  This event is the largest amateur radio digital communications conference in the nation, and attracts some of the most innovative hams from across the United States, Canada and beyond.

The weekend will be filled with introductory, semi-technical, and technical presentations, meals with speakers, technical demonstrations, prizes, and opportunities to establish or build relationships with some of amateur radio’s notable technical innovators. All amateur radio operators, from beginner to experienced, would gain from the practical information and demonstrations that will be offered at DCC.

Topics that are typically highlighted at TAPR Digital Communications Conferences as well as within the conference’s 100 page printed proceedings book: 

— Software Defined Radio (SDR)
— Digital voice (D-Star, DMR, P25, WinDRM, FDMDV, DRMDV, G4GUO, etc.)
— Digital satellite communications
— Global positioning system applications
— Precise Timing
— Automatic Packet Reporting System (APRS)
— Short messaging (a mode of APRS)
— Digital Signal Processing (DSP)
— HF digital modes
— Internet interoperability with Amateur Radio networks
— Spread spectrum applications
— IEEE 802.11 and other Part 15 license-exempt systems adaptable for Amateur Radio
— Using TCP/IP networking over Amateur Radio
— Mesh and peer to peer wireless networking
— Emergency and Homeland Defense backup digital communications in Amateur Radio
— Updates on AX.25 and other wireless networking protocols
— Other topics that advance the Amateur Radio art

The TAPR Digital Communications Conference also serves as the annual meeting of TAPR. Rocky Mountain Ham Radio, New Mexico has partnered with TAPR to serve as this year’s local event host.

Complete details about this year’s Conference, including the schedule of events, the presentation lineup, conference hotel information, and much more, can be found at https://www.tapr.org/dcc.html  Online registration is available at https://www.tapr.org/dccregistration.php   A flyer has also been attached to this email.

PRESENTERS WANTED: There are a few remaining speaker slots at this year’s DCC.  The kinds of presentations you saw (or gave) at the New Mexico TechFest would be perfect for the DCC audience.  If you are interested in presenting on an emerging or relevant amateur radio technical topics, technique, experiment, or project that you have been working on, please email both myself as well as Steven Bible N7HPR (steven.bible@...) with your thoughts.

Whether you attend for just a day or for the full weekend conference, we hope you’ll take part in this unique amateur radio event, meet some of amateur radio's technical innovators from across the United States and beyond, and gain from the practical information and demonstrations offered by the TAPR Digital Communications Conference.  The Conference continues its rotation to another part of the country next year, so don’t pass up a great opportunity to attend while it’s (finally) in our backyard!

Thanks and 73,
Brian N5ZGT


Re: coax question

Mike WB2FKO
 

Thanks for all the responses, both on and off the list.  Here is a summary of the advice I have received:

* Only use the ultraflex cable for the portion of the feedline that is out of the sun
* Use 1/2 inch superflex aka Andrews FSJ4-50B heliax
* Use RG-213
* Use LMR-400 UF obtained from a reputable source like Times Microwave (I'm not sure where the various suppliers I have used get their feedline; perhaps it is China)
* Do not trust crimped-on connectors; make sure they are soldered

Bill's comment about crimping was clairvoyant.  As I did further troubleshooting over the weekend, I discovered that this is exactly what had happened on my 222 feedline.  It explains why I could not hear anybody on 222, so the transverter is probably OK.  The crimp connection pulled out at an N-connector junction just above the rotor and fortunately the main 50 ft feedline run was OK.  I replaced the broken jumper with a (far too long) section of one of my old rover feedlines and connected this to the 6m beam.  The 222 feedline allowed me to salvage Perseids and pickup six new grids. (Truth be told, I had worked 2 of those grids before but they were never confirmed on LOTW)

I have kept two of the dead cable runs, both used on 6m, but have already trashed 3 others over the years.  It will be interesting to see what a network analyzer reveals, although I don't have immediate access to one.

Thanks again for all the useful feedback.  Mike


Re: coax question

Bill
 

Mike, 

Another thought: 

Before you trash your failed cable, try to find out where the cable assy failed using a vector network analyzer in time domain mode. That may help you analyze the failure.

Bill W7QQ 


On Aug 12, 2018, at 5:02 PM, Michael Daly <arrowengineering1@...> wrote:

Hi,

I have copied my buddy Paull Holmes in Farmington about this issue.  He has two concerns.

First..

          My first question is if the cable with problems is genuine Times Microwave LMR-400 cable.  There are a number of companies (mostly Chinese) that are making "Times Microwave" alternatives.  Most of those are OK but do not have the quality control that the Times Microwave company does.  I also worry that some of the Chinese cable will say Times Microwave on it even though it is actually a "knock off". 

 

          If he is sure that the cable he is using is genuine Times Microwave cable then I would suggest that he give them a call and ask them what they believe might be the problem.  The cable should be able to handle a Kilowatt without a problem.  They would likely be interested if their cable is having problems.

 

Then in response to Keith’s point about UF version of LMR cable…

 

            The Times Microwave specs on their Ultra-Flex and the standard LMR-400 is -40 to 185 F degrees (operating).  Hard to imagine that the conditions are worse than that.  I believe that I would send an e-mail to Times Microwave and see what they say about the problem.  There are probably millions of feet of LMR-400 in use and the company has a stellar reputation.  I don’t know what the Time Microwave “knock off” specs are, probably not as good.

 

So more to chew on.  Contacting Times Microwave would seem to be first on the list after confirming it is truly Times Microwave.  And for goodness sake tell us the rest of the story.  I have LMR 400 Ultra Flex on my tower at the top.

 

Mike, n5sj

 

From: nmvhf@groups.io [mailto:nmvhf@groups.io] On Behalf Of Keith Morehouse
Sent: Saturday, August 11, 2018 8:11 PM
To: nmvhf@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nmvhf] coax question

 

Mike, the 'UF' version of all the LMR cable, which is the rubber jacketed, direct bury capable, highly flexible version is notorious for getting soft in direct sun and allowing the inner conductor to push out toward the shield when it is held in a bend or, even worse where it is cable tied and allowed to hang free.  This, of course, causes a increase in VSWR without any other symptoms.

 

I had this problem in EN52 with a 432 MHz LMR600UF feedline twice (it took me two direct failures at the same place to realize what was happening).  As you can imagine, the sun during a EN52 summer may be hot, but I'll bet it's much 'less-hot' then in New Mexico.

 

As a rule, I no longer use LMR 'ultra-flex' in my system unless it is inside.  I'm also VERY careful in planning my rotor loops and flexible RF cable attachments to avoid any locations where there might be a abrupt direction change.

 

-W9RM

 


Keith J Morehouse
Managing Partner
Calmesa Partners G.P.
Olathe, CO

 

On Sat, Aug 11, 2018 at 6:37 PM, WB2FKO <mph@...> wrote:

I'm having an ongoing problem with burning up coax cable feedlines. This has been almost entirely on 6m, where I have been doing the majority of my operating the past few years and primarily during the summer Es season.  I usually run between 500--1000W.  SWR has been very good right up until the moment of failure, which never seems to occur at an opportune time.  Cable does not internally short, so I assume the inner conductor has wandered far enough to send SWR through the roof.  It has been happening every 18--24 months, with the latest cable failure during a meteor scatter run in this weekend's Perseids shower.  I don't trust my cable assembly skills, so have been buying professionally made cable runs from BuryFlex, CableXperts, and recently JEFA Tech, and always a variant of the flexible LMR400.  Stiffer cable would be a substantial pain to install at my station, but I will have to deal with it if this is the solution.  Advice appreciated.  Mike WB2FKO


 


Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: coax question

Bill
 

Gm Mike,

One of your comments triggered a thought here: you spoke about ordering only preassembled cables with connectors installed. Most preassembled cables use crimped connectors.

I’ve had bad luck with crimped “N” connectors pulling off the cable in tension. The cable shield slips away from the connector and pulls the center pin out of contact with the mating socket. In some cases the connector and cable separate completely, but I’ve found cases where the connector is attached but electrically compromised.

I use only soldered connector installation now.

The second thing to check is anything associated with your tower hazer installation which requires the entire feedline to be unsupported from the hazer to the ground. Look for any mechanical cycle fatigue stemming from the feedline moving in the wind. Same for rotor loops.

GL Bill W7QQ 


On Aug 12, 2018, at 5:02 PM, Michael Daly <arrowengineering1@...> wrote:

Hi,

I have copied my buddy Paull Holmes in Farmington about this issue.  He has two concerns.

First..

          My first question is if the cable with problems is genuine Times Microwave LMR-400 cable.  There are a number of companies (mostly Chinese) that are making "Times Microwave" alternatives.  Most of those are OK but do not have the quality control that the Times Microwave company does.  I also worry that some of the Chinese cable will say Times Microwave on it even though it is actually a "knock off". 

 

          If he is sure that the cable he is using is genuine Times Microwave cable then I would suggest that he give them a call and ask them what they believe might be the problem.  The cable should be able to handle a Kilowatt without a problem.  They would likely be interested if their cable is having problems.

 

Then in response to Keith’s point about UF version of LMR cable…

 

            The Times Microwave specs on their Ultra-Flex and the standard LMR-400 is -40 to 185 F degrees (operating).  Hard to imagine that the conditions are worse than that.  I believe that I would send an e-mail to Times Microwave and see what they say about the problem.  There are probably millions of feet of LMR-400 in use and the company has a stellar reputation.  I don’t know what the Time Microwave “knock off” specs are, probably not as good.

 

So more to chew on.  Contacting Times Microwave would seem to be first on the list after confirming it is truly Times Microwave.  And for goodness sake tell us the rest of the story.  I have LMR 400 Ultra Flex on my tower at the top.

 

Mike, n5sj

 

From: nmvhf@groups.io [mailto:nmvhf@groups.io] On Behalf Of Keith Morehouse
Sent: Saturday, August 11, 2018 8:11 PM
To: nmvhf@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nmvhf] coax question

 

Mike, the 'UF' version of all the LMR cable, which is the rubber jacketed, direct bury capable, highly flexible version is notorious for getting soft in direct sun and allowing the inner conductor to push out toward the shield when it is held in a bend or, even worse where it is cable tied and allowed to hang free.  This, of course, causes a increase in VSWR without any other symptoms.

 

I had this problem in EN52 with a 432 MHz LMR600UF feedline twice (it took me two direct failures at the same place to realize what was happening).  As you can imagine, the sun during a EN52 summer may be hot, but I'll bet it's much 'less-hot' then in New Mexico.

 

As a rule, I no longer use LMR 'ultra-flex' in my system unless it is inside.  I'm also VERY careful in planning my rotor loops and flexible RF cable attachments to avoid any locations where there might be a abrupt direction change.

 

-W9RM

 


Keith J Morehouse
Managing Partner
Calmesa Partners G.P.
Olathe, CO

 

On Sat, Aug 11, 2018 at 6:37 PM, WB2FKO <mph@...> wrote:

I'm having an ongoing problem with burning up coax cable feedlines. This has been almost entirely on 6m, where I have been doing the majority of my operating the past few years and primarily during the summer Es season.  I usually run between 500--1000W.  SWR has been very good right up until the moment of failure, which never seems to occur at an opportune time.  Cable does not internally short, so I assume the inner conductor has wandered far enough to send SWR through the roof.  It has been happening every 18--24 months, with the latest cable failure during a meteor scatter run in this weekend's Perseids shower.  I don't trust my cable assembly skills, so have been buying professionally made cable runs from BuryFlex, CableXperts, and recently JEFA Tech, and always a variant of the flexible LMR400.  Stiffer cable would be a substantial pain to install at my station, but I will have to deal with it if this is the solution.  Advice appreciated.  Mike WB2FKO


 


Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: coax question

Michael Daly
 

Hi,

I have copied my buddy Paull Holmes in Farmington about this issue.  He has two concerns.

First..

          My first question is if the cable with problems is genuine Times Microwave LMR-400 cable.  There are a number of companies (mostly Chinese) that are making "Times Microwave" alternatives.  Most of those are OK but do not have the quality control that the Times Microwave company does.  I also worry that some of the Chinese cable will say Times Microwave on it even though it is actually a "knock off". 

 

          If he is sure that the cable he is using is genuine Times Microwave cable then I would suggest that he give them a call and ask them what they believe might be the problem.  The cable should be able to handle a Kilowatt without a problem.  They would likely be interested if their cable is having problems.

 

Then in response to Keith’s point about UF version of LMR cable…

 

            The Times Microwave specs on their Ultra-Flex and the standard LMR-400 is -40 to 185 F degrees (operating).  Hard to imagine that the conditions are worse than that.  I believe that I would send an e-mail to Times Microwave and see what they say about the problem.  There are probably millions of feet of LMR-400 in use and the company has a stellar reputation.  I don’t know what the Time Microwave “knock off” specs are, probably not as good.

 

So more to chew on.  Contacting Times Microwave would seem to be first on the list after confirming it is truly Times Microwave.  And for goodness sake tell us the rest of the story.  I have LMR 400 Ultra Flex on my tower at the top.

 

Mike, n5sj

 

From: nmvhf@groups.io [mailto:nmvhf@groups.io] On Behalf Of Keith Morehouse
Sent: Saturday, August 11, 2018 8:11 PM
To: nmvhf@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nmvhf] coax question

 

Mike, the 'UF' version of all the LMR cable, which is the rubber jacketed, direct bury capable, highly flexible version is notorious for getting soft in direct sun and allowing the inner conductor to push out toward the shield when it is held in a bend or, even worse where it is cable tied and allowed to hang free.  This, of course, causes a increase in VSWR without any other symptoms.

 

I had this problem in EN52 with a 432 MHz LMR600UF feedline twice (it took me two direct failures at the same place to realize what was happening).  As you can imagine, the sun during a EN52 summer may be hot, but I'll bet it's much 'less-hot' then in New Mexico.

 

As a rule, I no longer use LMR 'ultra-flex' in my system unless it is inside.  I'm also VERY careful in planning my rotor loops and flexible RF cable attachments to avoid any locations where there might be a abrupt direction change.

 

-W9RM

 


Keith J Morehouse
Managing Partner
Calmesa Partners G.P.
Olathe, CO

 

On Sat, Aug 11, 2018 at 6:37 PM, WB2FKO <mph@...> wrote:

I'm having an ongoing problem with burning up coax cable feedlines. This has been almost entirely on 6m, where I have been doing the majority of my operating the past few years and primarily during the summer Es season.  I usually run between 500--1000W.  SWR has been very good right up until the moment of failure, which never seems to occur at an opportune time.  Cable does not internally short, so I assume the inner conductor has wandered far enough to send SWR through the roof.  It has been happening every 18--24 months, with the latest cable failure during a meteor scatter run in this weekend's Perseids shower.  I don't trust my cable assembly skills, so have been buying professionally made cable runs from BuryFlex, CableXperts, and recently JEFA Tech, and always a variant of the flexible LMR400.  Stiffer cable would be a substantial pain to install at my station, but I will have to deal with it if this is the solution.  Advice appreciated.  Mike WB2FKO


 


Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: coax question

Keith Morehouse
 

Mike, the 'UF' version of all the LMR cable, which is the rubber jacketed, direct bury capable, highly flexible version is notorious for getting soft in direct sun and allowing the inner conductor to push out toward the shield when it is held in a bend or, even worse where it is cable tied and allowed to hang free.  This, of course, causes a increase in VSWR without any other symptoms.

I had this problem in EN52 with a 432 MHz LMR600UF feedline twice (it took me two direct failures at the same place to realize what was happening).  As you can imagine, the sun during a EN52 summer may be hot, but I'll bet it's much 'less-hot' then in New Mexico.

As a rule, I no longer use LMR 'ultra-flex' in my system unless it is inside.  I'm also VERY careful in planning my rotor loops and flexible RF cable attachments to avoid any locations where there might be a abrupt direction change.

-W9RM


Keith J Morehouse
Managing Partner
Calmesa Partners G.P.
Olathe, CO

On Sat, Aug 11, 2018 at 6:37 PM, WB2FKO <mph@...> wrote:
I'm having an ongoing problem with burning up coax cable feedlines. This has been almost entirely on 6m, where I have been doing the majority of my operating the past few years and primarily during the summer Es season.  I usually run between 500--1000W.  SWR has been very good right up until the moment of failure, which never seems to occur at an opportune time.  Cable does not internally short, so I assume the inner conductor has wandered far enough to send SWR through the roof.  It has been happening every 18--24 months, with the latest cable failure during a meteor scatter run in this weekend's Perseids shower.  I don't trust my cable assembly skills, so have been buying professionally made cable runs from BuryFlex, CableXperts, and recently JEFA Tech, and always a variant of the flexible LMR400.  Stiffer cable would be a substantial pain to install at my station, but I will have to deal with it if this is the solution.  Advice appreciated.  Mike WB2FKO





coax question

Mike WB2FKO
 

I'm having an ongoing problem with burning up coax cable feedlines. This has been almost entirely on 6m, where I have been doing the majority of my operating the past few years and primarily during the summer Es season.  I usually run between 500--1000W.  SWR has been very good right up until the moment of failure, which never seems to occur at an opportune time.  Cable does not internally short, so I assume the inner conductor has wandered far enough to send SWR through the roof.  It has been happening every 18--24 months, with the latest cable failure during a meteor scatter run in this weekend's Perseids shower.  I don't trust my cable assembly skills, so have been buying professionally made cable runs from BuryFlex, CableXperts, and recently JEFA Tech, and always a variant of the flexible LMR400.  Stiffer cable would be a substantial pain to install at my station, but I will have to deal with it if this is the solution.  Advice appreciated.  Mike WB2FKO


WWV, WWVH,, and WWVB threatened with closure under 2019 NIST budget

James Duffey
 

For many of us, one of our first exposures to ham radio was listening to WWV. Many of us still use it as a propagation indicator, a simple frequency standard, an introduction to others of the usefulness of radio, and yes, even to set our watches. This utility is now threatened. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)’s budget is severely reduced in the presidential budget for 2019 and the core measurement science group, which among other duties, runs WWV, WWVH, and WWVB, has born a significant amount of that cut. To deal with the cuts, in part NIST has proposed eliminating the NIST run radio stations, to a savings of $6.3M.

< https://www.nist.gov/director/fy-2019-presidential-budget-request-summary/fundamental-measurement-quantum-science-and >

This is an e-mail about radio, not politics, but occasionally the two overlap. If you want to see the continuation of the NIST time and frequency standard radio stations, write a postcard to your national elected representative telling them that as well as a post card to NIST telling them that you are concerned about their course of action. If not, ignore this post.

Thanks for reading this and if you feel like deleting it, go ahead. - Duffey KK6MC

James Duffey KK6MC
Cedar Crest NM


CQ VHF Logs - Club Name

KC7QY
 

The robot will only accept New Mexico VHF Society for club name. NM VHF Society bounced.
 
Jim KC7QY


Round table

Bruce Draper
 

Tuesday evening at 8 PM on 50.133 MHz.


Re: CQWW VHF

Keith Morehouse
 

Mike, congratulations on a good result !

Mike and I have somewhat conflicting views on the merits of FT8 during contests and we discussed it a lot during the W5UHF multi-op in June.  I'm not a big fan of it, as it's so very slow.  But, I certainly see the plus-side of it when 6M is not yet open (or open well enough to support QSO's on a more 'rapid' mode).  As Mike mentioned, use all the tools in the box to maximize results, BUT, know WHICH tool is the best, for you, at any given point in the contest.

As a side note, it appears W5PR in EL29 will either win or be highly competitive for the 6M single-band championship this weekend.  He is a perennial high scorer on 6M.  This weekend, he made 650+ QSO's without using FT8 at all.  Think about that the next time you're tempted to remain on FT8 when the band opens.

-W9RM

Keith J Morehouse
Managing Partner
Calmesa Partners G.P.
Olathe, CO

On Mon, Jul 23, 2018 at 1:09 PM, WB2FKO <mph@...> wrote:
For better or worse, this CQWW was all about FT8.  W9RM predicted that ops would get transfixed to their computer screens attempting to make digital QSOs when 6m Es could easily support faster, more efficient ssb.  This is exactly what happened.  An additional source of confusion was the incompatibility of North American contest mode and the regular DX mode of FT8.  Most were using the latter.  This often doubled completion time or prevented a QSO altogether.  In my opinion, the misunderstanding and mis-use of FT8 is the biggest issue/problem in VHF, contesting or otherwise.

Largely because of FT8, I scored a new personal best for this contest, worked Jim K6MIO to complete 6m WAS (pending receipt of his card), added 3 new DXCC and a few rare grids including DM86 on 6 and 2 (thanks Duffey).  Meteor scatter was entirely unproductive in this one, probably because everyone was sitting on 50.313 using FT8.

Mike WB2FKO

On 07/22/2018 04:21 PM, Keith Morehouse wrote:
Thanks to KK6MC/r for another great rove.  I worked him from DM86, DM74, DM75 & DM64 on 2M and from DM86 on 6M, where he was quite strong.  Both the DM86 QSOs are new all-time grids for me.

Also, thanks to N5SJ for a 2M QSO at the end of the contest for DM55.  We've worked before, but his new antenna system was head and shoulders above the old !

I also worked club members W7QQ & WB2FKO on both bands and N5JEH on 2M.  Thanks to all !

-W9RM

Keith J Morehouse
Managing Partner
Calmesa Partners G.P.
Olathe, CO




Re: CQWW VHF

Mike WB2FKO
 

For better or worse, this CQWW was all about FT8.  W9RM predicted that ops would get transfixed to their computer screens attempting to make digital QSOs when 6m Es could easily support faster, more efficient ssb.  This is exactly what happened.  An additional source of confusion was the incompatibility of North American contest mode and the regular DX mode of FT8.  Most were using the latter.  This often doubled completion time or prevented a QSO altogether.  In my opinion, the misunderstanding and mis-use of FT8 is the biggest issue/problem in VHF, contesting or otherwise.

Largely because of FT8, I scored a new personal best for this contest, worked Jim K6MIO to complete 6m WAS (pending receipt of his card), added 3 new DXCC and a few rare grids including DM86 on 6 and 2 (thanks Duffey).  Meteor scatter was entirely unproductive in this one, probably because everyone was sitting on 50.313 using FT8.

Mike WB2FKO

On 07/22/2018 04:21 PM, Keith Morehouse wrote:
Thanks to KK6MC/r for another great rove.  I worked him from DM86, DM74, DM75 & DM64 on 2M and from DM86 on 6M, where he was quite strong.  Both the DM86 QSOs are new all-time grids for me.

Also, thanks to N5SJ for a 2M QSO at the end of the contest for DM55.  We've worked before, but his new antenna system was head and shoulders above the old !

I also worked club members W7QQ & WB2FKO on both bands and N5JEH on 2M.  Thanks to all !

-W9RM

Keith J Morehouse
Managing Partner
Calmesa Partners G.P.
Olathe, CO



CQWW VHF

Keith Morehouse
 

Thanks to KK6MC/r for another great rove.  I worked him from DM86, DM74, DM75 & DM64 on 2M and from DM86 on 6M, where he was quite strong.  Both the DM86 QSOs are new all-time grids for me.

Also, thanks to N5SJ for a 2M QSO at the end of the contest for DM55.  We've worked before, but his new antenna system was head and shoulders above the old !

I also worked club members W7QQ & WB2FKO on both bands and N5JEH on 2M.  Thanks to all !

-W9RM

Keith J Morehouse
Managing Partner
Calmesa Partners G.P.
Olathe, CO


Re: KK6MC/r in CQ WW VHF Contest

Keith Morehouse
 

..picking a nit, but for USA clubs, it's a whole 1.5 miles more radius - 250 miles :)
Those old-timer USA contesters don't do no stinkin' kilometers :)

-RM

Keith J Morehouse
Managing Partner
Calmesa Partners G.P.
Olathe, CO

On Sat, Jul 21, 2018 at 9:13 AM, <n5epa.bob@...> wrote:
CQ WW: club is located or within a 400 km (248.5 mile) radius circle from the center of club area

A large area indeed for CQ WW contests. No local category.

N5EPA

From: "Keith Morehouse" <w9rm@...>
To: nmvhf@groups.io
Sent: Saturday, July 21, 2018 7:28:08 AM
Subject: Re: [nmvhf] KK6MC/r in CQ WW VHF Contest

That is NOT the case for CQ contests - it is distance.
I am able to submit my score for CQWW VHF for the club.

-W9RM

Keith J Morehouse
Managing Partner
Calmesa Partners G.P.
Olathe, CO

On Fri, Jul 20, 2018 at 9:01 PM, Arne N7KA <N7KA@...> wrote:
Just checked and NMVHF Society is not listed in the CQ Club listing.  Unknown what the CQ boundary is but think they would parallel ARRL definitions.  For NMVHF in ARRL contests, stations must operate from within the borders of New Mexico.

Arne N7KA



Re: KK6MC/r in CQ WW VHF Contest

n5epa.bob@...
 

CQ WW: club is located or within a 400 km (248.5 mile) radius circle from the center of club area

A large area indeed for CQ WW contests. No local category.

N5EPA


From: "Keith Morehouse" <w9rm@...>
To: nmvhf@groups.io
Sent: Saturday, July 21, 2018 7:28:08 AM
Subject: Re: [nmvhf] KK6MC/r in CQ WW VHF Contest

That is NOT the case for CQ contests - it is distance.
I am able to submit my score for CQWW VHF for the club.

-W9RM

Keith J Morehouse
Managing Partner
Calmesa Partners G.P.
Olathe, CO

On Fri, Jul 20, 2018 at 9:01 PM, Arne N7KA <N7KA@...> wrote:
Just checked and NMVHF Society is not listed in the CQ Club listing.  Unknown what the CQ boundary is but think they would parallel ARRL definitions.  For NMVHF in ARRL contests, stations must operate from within the borders of New Mexico.

Arne N7KA


2M tropo & FT8

Keith Morehouse
 

The tropo conditions over the south central part of the country are still with us Saturday morning.  The weather pattern that has formed it looks to be holding for another day, at least.  If you are east of the divide, be aware that 2M propagation could exist to the SE, particularly in the AM.  If the wind starts blowing, it will degrade the tropo quickly.

Good luck in the contest - don't be fixated on FT8 - be prepared to QSY to a high rate mode (SSB or CW) if signal levels begin to rise on 6M.

-W9RM

Keith J Morehouse
Managing Partner
Calmesa Partners G.P.
Olathe, CO


Re: [Rover] CQ WW VHF contest -- W3DHJ/R (fwd)

Ed
 

I am there once and awhile. Also Mike  K9VSW is there .  Made several calls after I worked EM73 but to nq avail.

   Ed N5JEH

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: WB2FKO
Sent: Friday, July 20, 2018 1:50 PM
To: nmvhf@groups.io
Cc: RMVHF+; RMVHF+; Grand Mesa Contest Club
Subject: Re: [nmvhf] [Rover] CQ WW VHF contest -- W3DHJ/R (fwd)

 

Is anyone aware of activity on 2m FT8?  Presumably 144.174?

WB2FKO DM65

On 07/20/2018 12:42 PM, Keith Morehouse wrote:

FYI to all, concerning the CQWW VHF tomorrow.  Today (Friday) at noon, there was widespread tropo on 2M east of the continental divide and SE into W4/W5 land.  Unless there is a drastic shift in WX patterns out there, it will most likely appear tomorrow as well.

 

Keep an ear open for it.

 

-W9RM

Keith J Morehouse
via Moto G

 

On Fri, Jul 20, 2018, 12:30 PM Jonesy W3DHJ via Groups.Io <mailserver=jonz.net@groups.io> wrote:

Well, I finished building up the rover -- and Murphy has yet
to make an appearance.  "Things" seem to check out ok, and
there even was 50mcs propagation to the EM50 area and its
surrounds at 1800z.

(There are Way More new unmodulated carriers on 50mcs around my
 QTH now-a-days.  There are probably more and more WiFi routers,
 iToys using WiFi, wireless printers, wireless security cams, etc.
 The RF fog is making amateur radio less and less enjoyable.)

All operations will be close in to 38° N and 104° W.

SAT #1: DM88bb: 1800z~2030z

SAT #2: DM87bw: 2030z~2300z

SAT #3: DM77xw: 2300z~0030z

SAT #4: DM78xa: 0030z~0200+z


SUN #1: DM78xa: 1200z~1330z

SUN #2: DM77xw: 1330z~1630z

SUN #3: DM87cx: 1630z~1930z

SUN #4: DM88bb: 1900z~2100z


A wee bit more detail
at:
        https://W3DHJ.net/vhfrover_plans.php

73
Jonesy
--
<pre>  Marvin L Jones     | W3DHJ      | W3DHJ  | https://W3DHJ.net/
        Pueblo, Colorado  |  @         | Jonesy |     __ linux FreeBSD
         38.238N 104.547W |   jonz.net | DM78rf | 73  SK


 

 


Re: KK6MC/r in CQ WW VHF Contest

Keith Morehouse
 

That is NOT the case for CQ contests - it is distance.
I am able to submit my score for CQWW VHF for the club.

-W9RM

Keith J Morehouse
Managing Partner
Calmesa Partners G.P.
Olathe, CO

On Fri, Jul 20, 2018 at 9:01 PM, Arne N7KA <N7KA@...> wrote:
Just checked and NMVHF Society is not listed in the CQ Club listing.  Unknown what the CQ boundary is but think they would parallel ARRL definitions.  For NMVHF in ARRL contests, stations must operate from within the borders of New Mexico.

Arne N7KA


> On July 20, 2018 at 5:56 PM James Duffey <JamesDuffey@...> wrote:
>
>
> Here is my itinerary for the June CQ WW VHF contest. W7QQ noted that the eastern Grids are often neglected in our roves, so I am focusing on the NE corner of the state on Saturday and then heading W towards home on Sunday.
>
> The CO guys should be possible to work on Saturday as I have worked CO from all of those grids. Albuquerque should be possible from all of these grids and if we get some short Es AZ should also be possible. Western NM may be tough though. I will have APRS and you can follow me on APRS.fi .
>
> If you are a member of NM VHF Society, please submit a log and use NM VHF Society as the name. It is not clear to me if there are boundary limits to club contributions, but if they are it is 250 MIles. That should cover everyone in NM, West TX, including El Paso, and Southern CO to include W9RM in Olathe.
>
> Listen for the weak ones. - Duffey KK6MC
>
> I hope you can
>
> On            Grid            Location                                                        Off
>
> 1800Z DM86as  Capulin Volcano                                         1915Z
>
> 2200Z DM85ct  (About 10 east of Mosquera)             2315Z
>
> 0045Z DM84hx (about 15 miles south of San Jon)        0200Z
>
> Overnight in Tucumcari.
>
> 1400Z DM85cd  (Tucumcari Municipal Park)                      1515Z
>
> 1615Z     DM74xv (South east of Santa Rosa)                   1730Z
>
> 1945Z DM75ba  (15 miles east of Moriarty)                     2000Z
>
> 2030Z DM64xx  (Moriarty Airport)                                      2100Z End of contest
>
>
>
> On            Grid                                                                    Off
> 1800Z  DM84hx (about 15 mi South of San Jon)  1915Z
>
> 2045Z DM85ct ( about 10 mi east of Mosquera) 2215Z
>
> 0105Z DM86as
>
>
>
>
>
> James Duffey KK6MC
> Cedar Crest NM
>
>
>




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